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Welcome to The Once Lost Wanderer. The name is derived from two poems: Amazing Grace by reformed slave trader John Newton, and All That is Gold Does Not Glitter by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Happy Anniversary to The Classics Club

In honor of The Classics Club 4th Anniversary, I've decided to retake and update The CC Club 50 Question survey.



1. My blog: The Once Lost Wanderer
2. Joined May 2014 – I’ve completed 42 of 50 of my Classics Club challenge
--May 2017 update: Finished, now on book 5 of my second list (75 books this time)
3. Currently reading: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
--May 2017 update: Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackery
4. Last finished: Tom Jones by Henry Fielding
--May 2017 update: Appointment in Samarra by John O'Hara
5. Next up: War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
--May 2017 update: The Golden Bowl by Henry James
6. Best book with the Classics Club: Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell, close second David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
--May 2017 update: I'll not add The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
7. Most Anticipated (remaining): Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
--May 2017 update: The Chronicles of Narnia
8. Avoiding: None really, but a tad intimidated by War and Peace
--May 2017 update: W&P was fairly easy to read...and excellent.
9. First Classic ever read: The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
10. Classic that inspired me: The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoyevsky
--May 2017 update: Les Mis
11. Longest classic: Don Quixote so far, but soon to be War and Peace
--May 2017 update: Now War and Peace
12. Longest classic left: and then…The Count of Monte Cristo
--May 2017 update: A Remembrance of Things Past
13. Oldest classic I’ve Read: The Book of Job
14. Oldest classic left: Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne 1759
15. Favorite biography about a classic author: Mark Twain
--May 2017 update: A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War by Joseph LaConte about C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien
16. Classic everyone should read: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
17. Favorite edition of a classic you own? The Lord of the Rings – Barbara Remington covers, the editions I first read

18. Favorite movie adaption of a classic: The Lord of the Rings, close second To Kill a Mockingbird
19: Classic which hasn’t been adapted and should be: The Catcher in the Rye, close second Invisible Man
20. Least favorite classic: Ulysses, presumably because I’m a simpleton.
21. Five authors I haven’t read, but cannot wait to read (remaining): Ayn Rand, Ford Madox Ford, Henry James, Graham Greene, Stendhal
--May 2017 update: Yet to get to Stendhal, now adding: Marcel Proust, Louisa May Alcott, Robert Heinlein, and oh I don't know - Balzac.
22. Title by one of the five most excites me: Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
--May 2017 Update: The Charterhouse of Parma
23. Classic I disliked first read, but liked better second time: The Catcher inthe Rye
24. Classic character I can’t get out of my head: Scarlett O’Hara
25. Classic character most reminds me of myself: Tom Sawyer
26. Classic character I wish I was like: Atticus Finch
27. Classic character reminds me of my best friend: Ralph from Lord of theFlies
28. Classic I’d like to read 500 more pages of: The Brothers Karamazov
29. Favorite children’s classic: The Little Prince
30. Who recommended your first classic? My fifth grade teacher, Mrs. Banks recommended The Hobbit. I will always love her.
31. Whose advice do you always take when it comes to literature: No one that I always take, but the one I esteem most is my second oldest son. His older brother and younger sister get high marks too.
32. Favorite memory with a classic: When Scout will not lead Boo Radley home, but rather sees to it that he escorts her. (To Kill a Mockingbird)
33. Classic author I’ve read the most works by: Charles Dickens
34. Classic author who has the most works on your club list: Henry James
35. Classic author you own the most books by: J.R.R. Tolkien
36. Classic title(s) that didn’t make it on my list, but I wish did: Tom Sawyer, Of Mice and Men, A Tale of Two Cities
37. Author whose career I’d like to explore from beginning to end: J.R.R. Tolkien
38. How many rereads are on my list: 20
--May 2017 update: on my second Classic Club iteration: 8
39. Title I simply could not finish: none, but Ulysses was close
40. Title I expected to dislike, but loved: Anna Karenina
41. Five things I’m looking forward to next year: A Handfull of Dust by Evely Waugh, The Good Soldier by Ford Maddox Ford, The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis, Remembrance of Things Past by Marcel Proust, The Charterhouse of Parma by Stendhal
--May 2017 update: Actually, these all still apply
42. Classic I will definitely read next year: Appointment in Samarra by John O’Hara
--May 2017 update: A Handful of Dust (just came in the mail yesterday btw)
43. Classic I will NOT read next year: A Tale of Two Cities
--May 2017 update: but I'll get to it later: The Tale of the Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
44. Favorite thing about being a member of the Classics Club? Oh, the true answer is so narcissistic. I want to say, reading others views…all that. But truly, the favorite thing….is just more page views and comments on my blog.
45. Five fellow clubbers whose blogs you frequent: So many…the guilt would kill me of listing only five
46. Favorite post by a fellow clubber: Again so many…but I am going to name one. Not a single post, but I do love the passion that Jillian at History Is Not Was has for her favorite author Margaret Mitchell
47. Read along experience: Just started a 20 month read along of The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens
--May 2017 update: Still going on Pickwick
48. Classic title for a readalong: Ummm…The Pickwick Papers
49. How long have I been reading classics: age 10 (that means 45 years)
--May 2017 update: 46 now
50. Share up to five posts: Oh, I think I’ve already abused the spirit of this very fun survey, to shamelessly self-promote with enough links to my reviews. So, I’ll only share two. I am very pleased with how I came up with my list, and then the list itself…and I love feedback:
--May 2017 update: I thought this post was rather fun. Ten Authors Walk into a Bar
Bonus. Question you wish was on this questionnaire: If you could sit in a pub and share a pint (or make it in the parlor and tea if you prefer), with any TWO classic authors at the same time, who would you choose? My answer: I said Mark Twain and Kurt Vonnegut last time, and they’re drunk now, so I’ll say Tolkien and Lewis.
Thanks to our mods for this very fun survey!!!!

10 comments:

  1. As regards your bonus question, and before I saw your answer, I said Lewis and Tolkien too. And I would say The Lord of the Rings covers with Tolkien's cover art are the best, but you might not have those. Other random observations...I think you'll like Henry James. He reminds me of Edith Wharton, but I'd give the edge to Wharton. And I REALLY nee to read The Little Prince.

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    1. Yes what fun it would be to eavesdrop on Tolkien and Lewis. You're probably aware, there is a film in the works by that name...on that subject. I'm a bit dubious...but we shall see. My attachment to the Barbara Remington cover art is partly sentimental...they were my first editions...and really the first books I ever bought with my own money. I like how they combine to form a mural. But yes, Tolkien's own are is superb. I have no editions with that as the cover, but I do have an edition of The Hobbit that contains Tolken's illustrations. Thanks for the feedback.

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    2. Oh and I have a copy of Mr. Bliss with Tolkien's artwork as well.

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  2. This blogger just did a little feature on those Lord of the Rings covers you like. I've never seen them before reading her blog post but I really like the illustrations. According to Millie's post, they're the only editions authorized by Tolkien.
    https://milliebotreads.wordpress.com/2016/04/08/judging-a-book-by-its-cover-the-hobbit-etc-vi/

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  3. Aw, I've just noticed your answer to #6. Thank you. xx

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  4. I mean 46! The part about me, ha ha!

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  5. I'd share a pint with Margaret Mitchell and a cup of tea with Austen -- all three of us together at the same time, only like Austen I'd have tea, because I don't drink. I don't think Mitchell did either, so really I'd suggest a tall cup of Georgia lemonade, frankly.

    Oh, dear, sir. A Tale of Two Cities is SO GOOD. Maybe that one's a reread. I see you've read plenty of Dickens. :)

    YAY for your #24! :)

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    1. The only reason I definitely will not read A Tale of Two Cities next year, is because it is not in the queue. I LOVE To2C, in fact I assert it is Dickens' greatest work, though David Copperfield is the consensus. (I knew what you meant, re #46) Nice choices for your tea party.

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    2. I hopped over here because you linked this post at my blog, but I see I have already been here. :) These questionnaires are always fun to read. I like your update to #15! As well as #10 and #7. I love that Lord of the Rings was your first classic. It seems you love it as I love my very first old tome. x

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